Impromptu Manifesto

words and more words.

goodtypography:

https://www.behance.net/gallery/Lettering-and-Logos-Part-4/15977085

(via betype)

thekingdomblog:

the realest thing I’ve ever read. 

(via sinkingradiocity)

goodtypography:

http://www.posterama.co/blogs/news/13414153-top-10-think-different-posters

(via letteraddict)

To the boys who may one day date my daughter

A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say.

Italo Calvino, The Uses of Literature (via thegirlandherbooks)

(via algonquinbooks)

It’s not really a matter of feeling worthy of love, friends, health, or wealth. Or of appreciating what you already have. Or even of learning to love yourself. These don’t have to come first. You don’t have to wear a halo to manifest the changes you want.

It’s simply a matter of understanding that if you do your part: visualize, prepare the way, and act “as if,” without looking over your shoulder for quick results, what you want must be added unto you… as will the feelings of worthiness, appreciation and loving your most lovable self.

You were pre-qualified…

The Universe

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

(via seaflames)

converginglinesbma:

Exactly 49 years ago yesterday, Sol LeWitt sent Eva Hesse an extraordinary 5-page letter in which he famously urged:

“Just stop thinking, worrying, looking over your shoulder wondering, doubting, fearing, hurting, hoping for some easy way out, struggling, grasping, confusing, itching, scratching, mumbling, bumbling, grumbling, humbling, stumbling, numbling, rumbling, gambling, tumbling, scumbling, scrambling, hitching, hatching, bitching, moaning, groaning, honing, boning, horse-shitting, hair-splitting, nit-picking, piss-trickling, nose sticking, ass-gouging, eyeball-poking, finger-pointing, alleyway-sneaking, long waiting, small stepping, evil-eyeing, back-scratching, searching, perching, besmirching, grinding, grinding, grinding away at yourself. Stop it and just DO!”

If you’re in Austin, make sure to stop by Converging Lines before it closes May 18 to see the letter in its entirety!

(via thearspoetica)

Maybe some people just aren’t meant to be in our lives forever. Maybe some people are just passing through. It’s like some people just come through our lives to bring us something: a gift, a blessing, a lesson we need to learn. And that’s why they’re here. You’ll have that gift forever.

Danielle Steel (via onlinecounsellingcollege)